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The Case Against Marine Mammals in Captivity The Humane Society of the United States

The Case Against Marine Mammals in Captivity

The Humane Society of the United States

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Paperback
46 pages
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 About the Book 

The captive display industry is not static, and neither is our report, The Case Against Marine Mammals in Captivity—a forceful, evidence-driven argument against the public display of dolphins, whales, and other marine mammals, which The HumaneMoreThe captive display industry is not static, and neither is our report, The Case Against Marine Mammals in Captivity—a forceful, evidence-driven argument against the public display of dolphins, whales, and other marine mammals, which The Humane Society of the United States first published in 1995.The fourth edition, released in May 2009, reflects the ever-changing nature of the captive display industry. The industry has evolved over the years- while some display facilities have closed in the United States and Europe, more have opened in the Caribbean and Asia, where there are few or no regulatory restrictions on operators. Whats more, Japans brutal dolphin drive hunts have continued to set aside bottlenose dolphins and other species for sale to display facilities, and promotion by cruise lines is contributing to the expansion of “swim with” activities. These trends, combined with increasing concerns about hurricanes that have damaged display facilities and killed dolphins, as well as a growing body of research on dolphin intelligence, have required us to broaden the focus of the original report.Co-produced by the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA), the fourth edition features recent capture information (for bottlenose dolphins, beluga whales, and orcas), new text addressing results from a web-based WSPA survey fielded by Harris Interactive, an entirely updated Solomon Islands appendix, an expanded discussion and new references on the inaccuracy or insufficiency of educational material provided by dolphinaria, and an expanded discussion of human-dolphin interactions.For the reader’s reference, there are numerous additions to the report’s Endnotes, where expanded technical discussions and references on points made in the main text are found—among them, many new publications, including studies on stress- expanded discussions of disease transmission risk and trainer injuries- mention of new laws and practices- additional information on dolphin drive fisheries, including an increasing awareness of mercury contamination- and the latest information on the capture, import, rehabilitation and release of various species.